Tips for Travelers

When visiting the wildlife park

  • Follow the rules, for e.g., do not walk around if you are not permitted to do so
  • Wear clothes in shades of brown and green as they are less disturbing to the environment
  • Avoid wearing perfumes and do not smoke in restricted areas.
  • Animals are extremely weary of the human voice. Don't make noise, don't play music and please don't honk car horn.
  • Carry Personal medication and insect repellent
  • Carry Binoculars, Cameras, film rolls and Flashlight along with books and other reading material
  • Don't leave behind any litter and plastic bags are big hazards for animals
  • Comfortable walking shoes are appropriate than the fashionable ones
  • For winter travel heavy woolens are a must especially for open jeep safaris. Cottons are apt for summer months
  • Rain Gear is essential for the monsoons and Find about the habits of the animal you want to see to avoid disappointment

Flora

Corbett National Park is rich in vegetation, with different kinds of trees and shrubs. The lower reaches of the Park, where the land is flat compared to the upper reaches, consists of tall and slender sal (Shorea robusta) trees. Shisham (Dalbergia sissoo) and khair (Acacia katechu) trees are found in the middle reaches, while the upper reaches of the mountains are full of bakli (Anogeissus latifolia), chir (Pinus roxburghii), gurail (Bauhinia racemosa) and bamboo trees. The Park is dotted with lantana shrubs, a species that is a great cause for concern. Imported years ago from America, the lantana shrub ensures that nothing else grows near it. In the Park are 110 species of trees, 51 species of shrubs, and over 33 species of bamboo and grass that are mostly found in chowds, or meadows.

Fauna
Corbett National Park has more than 50 species of mammals, 585 species of birds and 25 species of reptiles, but the Park is known for its elephants and leopards, not its tigers. Many kinds of deer, namely chital (spotted deer), sambar (Indian stag), chinkara (Indian gazelle), pada (hog deer) and muntjac (barking deer) abound in the Park. Tiger sighting is rare, in spite of a lot of alarm calls from monkeys and deer. Elephant herds comprising tuskers, females and calves are commonly seen. However, an elephant herd with calves is perhaps the most dangerous encounter in the wild, for elephants are very possessive of their young and do not hesitate to charge at intruding human beings.

Leopard sighting is even rarer than that of the tiger, and these spotted cats confine themselves to the higher reaches of the Park. Other feline species found in the Park are leopard cats, jungle cats, the rare fishing cat, and caracal, to name a few. Sloth bears, wild boars, monkeys, dholes (wild dogs), jackals and ghorals (mountain goats) also inhabit the Park.

The aquatic reptile population in the Park consists of mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) crocodiles, while Indian rock pythons, Russell's vipers, cobras, king cobras and common kraits are some of the snakes found in the Park. Bird life includes parakeets, flycatchers, babblers, cuckoos, robins, bulbuls, Indian and Great Pied hornbills, warblers and finches, to name a few.

Safaris
Elephant safaris can be arranged in Dhikala and Bijrani.
Jeep safaris are available from outside the Park as well as from Dhikala